In the press: How mindfulness keeps your healthy

Mindfulness may delay ageing and changes the grey matter in your brain, according to reports in the mainstream media

To recover from failure, try some self-compassion
Harvard Business Review, January 2017
The ability to self soothe, recognise mistakes, learn from them and motivate ourselves is essential in order to succeed. Self compassion is consistently correlated with measures of emotional wellbeing such as optimism, life satisfaction, autonomy and wisdom as well as reduced levels of stress, depression and anxiety. This article discusses how you integrate self compassion while still propelling yourself to succeed, in a kinder and often more effective way.

Can meditation help prevent the effects of ageing?
BBC, 1 July 2014, by Jo Marchant
Elizabeth Blackburn, who has won a Nobel Prize and was voted as one of Time’s 100 most influential people in the world in 2007, looks at how mindfulness may be targeting the parts of our DNA impacted upon by stress and in turn delaying the ageing process.

Mindfulness therapy comes at a high price for some, say experts
The Guardian, 25 August 2014, by Robert Booth
While mindfulness has been found to reduce relapses of depression by 44% by researchers at Oxford University, taking part in the course can be challenging as we discover patterns of behaviour that may not be serving us well. This article stresses the importance of finding the right teacher with appropriate levels of training.

How meditation may change the brain
The New York Times, 28 January 2011, by Sindya N Bhanoo
Positive measurable changes are reported in the grey-matter density of the parts of the brain associated with memory, learning, empathy, stress, anxiety and one’s sense of self.

Mindful presence: The heart of mind fitness training
The Huffington Post, 21 July 2011, by Joel and Michelle Levey
How Mindfulness, or “mind fitness”, is applied in various organisations: from Hewlett-Packard, “mindfulness was one of the core values held by senior leaders as a key to their success”; to Google, where leaders and software engineers want to “re-engineer their own personal operating systems”. Even surgeons are “making fewer mistakes and have better surgical outcomes”.