In the press: Mindfulness at work

As the likes of Apple, Google, Heinz, P&G and Unilever offer mindfulness training to staff, these articles explore the role of mindfulness in the workplace

Why some people get burned out and others don’t
Harvard Business Review, 23 November 2016, by Kandi Wiens and Annie McKee
While we know that stress often leads to burnout, it’s possible to handle the onslaught of long hours, high pressure, and work crises in a way that safeguards you from the emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and a lack of confidence in one’s abilities that characterizes burnout. The key is tapping into your emotional intelligence, a study has found.

Mindfulness works but only if you work at it
Harvard Business Review, 4 November 2016, by Megan Reitz and Michael Chaskalson
A study of 57 senior business leaders shows mindfulness improved their resilience, collaboration leadership in complex conditions – but only if they practiced it for more than 10 minutes a day. In a follow-up article, the researchers share their practical tips on how to bring mindfulness to your company’s leadership.

How to practice mindfulness throughout your work day
Harvard Business Review, 4 March 2016, by Rasmus Hougaard and Jacqueline Carter
As research shows we spend 47% of our time with our attention off-task, avoid unproductive multi-tasking by training your brain to focus. The authors share practical ways to do this in between emails, meetings and your commute.

Mindfulness meditation is big business in London’s Square Mile
The Independent, 14 March 2015, by Siobhan Norton
The benefits of mindfulness training are recognised by many companies in central London and the City – read some individual experiences and also hear from those who question if it has lost its spiritual roots.

Mindfulness at Davos
The Huffington Post, 21 January 2015, by Alena Hall
At the 2015 Davos Economic Summit, Jon Kabat-Zinn has led a conference-wide daily meditation session. These sessions help emphasise the importance of cultivating inner strength and wisdom in the face of challenges.

What’s it like to take Google’s mindfulness training?
Mindful Magazine, August 2014, by Mirabai Bush
Google offers a mindfulness training called ‘Search Inside Yourself’ as part of their commitment to employee wellbeing. Employees comment on their experience of taking part.
› Video interview: ‘That the mind could be hacked, that was just really eye’ – Bill Duane, senior manager at Google in charge of wellbeing

Does mindfulness have a place in the corporate world?
Marketing, 30 July 2014
Executives including the MD of Leo Burnett and the marketing boss at Ford Retail discuss whether mindfulness has a place in busy, dynamic work environments.

Happiness: Why workplace wellbeing is a serious issue
Marketing, 28 July 2014, by Rachel Barnes
Companies such as Apple, Google, Heinz, P&G and Unilever are offering mindfulness training to staff as it is increasingly being seen as underpinning their wellbeing.

Zen and the art of management
Financial Times, 16 September 2013, by John Paul Rathbone
High-profile executives including Lord Myners, former chairman of Marks and Spencer, and Peter Ng, chief investment manager of Singapore Investment Corporation, find that mindfulness enables them to be focused and innovative.

Mindfulness at work: What are the benefits?
The Guardian, 21 December 2012, by Gill Crossland-Thackray
This article highlights the benefits of mindfulness practices at work for reducing stress and anxiety, as well as increasing our emotional control and ability to deal with conflict.

The mind business
Financial Times, 24 August 2012, by David Gelles
General Mills, the company behind Häagen-Dazs ice cream, has incorporated mindfulness into the way it works and its corporate culture. As ancient insights and modern-day management theory come together at large corporates like Target, Google and First Direct, eastern wisdom is changing western business.

Distilling the wisdom of CEOs
The New York Times, 16 April 2011, by Adam Bryant
What does it take to be an effective leader? What are the X factors? The findings suggest that the qualities that set you apart are not qualities you are born with but rather qualities that can be developed and honed through awareness, attitude, habit and discipline.